Buying weed online can be safe and unsafe, depending on many different factors.

If you frequent marijuana websites, then I’m sure you have noticed a growing trend of people trying to sell marijuana over the internet. The sales pitches are bold, stating that they stock this strain and that strain, and to e-mail them for details.

These types of comments are all over not only TWB’s comments sections, but also in every large marijuana website’s comments sections. Consider this a public service announcement – beware buying marijuana on the internet.

You should really beware buying anything on the internet from a not reputable source. And realise that there is an added element when you are buying marijuana online. Not only can you get ripped off, you can get arrested when the marijuana comes in the mail. Not only are scammers posting those types of comments, I’m assuming narcs are too. Why wouldn’t they?

Does this mean that people never buy marijuana online successfully? No. I’m sure that there are many people that have bought marijuana online and do it all the time. But for every person that does it successfully, there’s an untold amount of people that get hustled or arrested.

I know that it’s tough when you can’t find marijuana. I can understand that it’s tempting to try out one of the people online to see if they are legit or not. But remember, there are bad people out there on the internet that are scamming people using all kinds of stories. Using promises to provide marijuana is just one of the latest scams. These are the same people that are pretending to be princes from Nigeria, or a long lost relative from Europe.

Don’t give these people your money. If you see their comments, flag them via Disquis. If you see them on Facebook, report them there too. I try to report as many as I can, but I am just one man working part time, and there are only so many hours during the day. Help me out by reporting these scammers on this site and any other marijuana website you see them on!

If you need marijuana so bad, go to Colorado, buy marijuana legally or illegally here https://www.hemptradecenter.com/ smoke to your hearts content.

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What is medical marijuana?

Photo of marijuana leaves.

The term medical marijuana refers to using the whole, unprocessed marijuana plant or its basic extracts to treat symptoms of illness and other conditions. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not recognized or approved the marijuana plant as medicine.

However, scientific study of the chemicals in marijuana, called cannabinoids, has led to two FDA-approved medications that contain cannabinoid chemicals in pill form. Continued research may lead to more medications.

Because the marijuana plant contains chemicals that may help treat a range of illnesses and symptoms, many people argue that it should be legal for medical purposes. In fact, a growing number of states have legalized marijuana for medical use.

General Remarks

There are marked differences in the knowledge on the medical uses of cannabis and cannabinoids in different diseases. For nausea and vomiting associated with cancer chemotherapy, anorexia and cachexia in HIV/AIDS, chronic, especially neuropathic pain, spasticity in multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury there is strong evidence for medical benefits. For many other indications, such as epilepsy, pruritus and depression there is much less available data. However, the scientific evidence for a specific indication does not necessarily reflect the actual therapeutic potential for a given disease.

Clinical studies with single cannabinoids or whole plant preparations (smoked cannabis, cannabis extract) have often been inspired by positive anecdotal experiences of patients employing crude cannabis products. The anti-emetic, the appetite enhancing, relaxing effects, analgesia, and therapeutic use in Tourette’s syndrome were all discovered in this manner.

Incidental observations have also revealed therapeutically useful effects. This occurred in a study with patients with Alzheimer’s disease wherein the primary issue was an examination of the appetite-stimulating effects of THC. Not only appetite and body weight increased, but disturbed behaviour among the patients also decreased. The discovery of decreased intraocular pressure with THC administration in the beginning of the 1970s was also serendipitous. Additional interesting indications that have not been scientifically investigated, but remain common problems in modern medicine may benefit from treatment with cannabis or cannabinoids. For this reason, surveys have been conducted questioning individuals that use cannabis therapeutically. They were conducted either as oral non-standardized interviews in the course of investigations of state or scientific institutions (House of Lords Select Committee on Science and Technology in the UK, Institute of Medicine in the USA) on the therapeutic potential of cannabis or as anonymous surveys using standardized questionnaires.

Nausea and Vomiting

Treatment of side effects associated with antineoplastic therapy is the indication for cannabinoids which has been most documented, with about 40 studies (THC, nabilone, other THC analogues, cannabis). Most trials were conducted in the 1980s. THC has to be dosed relatively highly, so that resultant side effects may occur comparatively frequently. THC was inferior to high-dose metoclopramide in one study. There are no comparisons of THC to the modern serotonin antagonists. Some recent investigations have shown that THC in low doses improves the efficacy of other antiemetic drugs if given together. In folk medicine cannabinoids are popular and are often used in other causes of nausea including AIDS and hepatitis.

Anorexia and Cachexia

An appetite enhancing effect of THC is observed with daily divided doses totalling 5 mg. When required, the daily dose may be increased to 20 mg. In a long-term study of 94 AIDS patients, the appetite-stimulating effect of THC continued for months, confirming the appetite enhancement noted in a shorter 6 week study. THC doubled appetite on a visual analogue scale in comparison to placebo. Patients tended to retain a stable body weight over the course of seven months. A positive influence on body weight was also reported in 15 patients with Alzheimer’s disease who were previously refusing food.

Spasticity

In many clinical trials of THC, nabilone and cannabis, a beneficial effect on spasticity caused by multiple sclerosis or spinal cord injury has been observed. Among other positively influenced symptoms were pain, paraesthesia, tremor and ataxia. In some studies improved bladder control was observed. There is also some anecdotal evidence of a benefit of cannabis in spasticity due to lesions of the brain.

Movement Disorders

There are some positive anecdotal reports of therapeutic response to cannabis in Tourette’s syndrome, dystonia and tardive dyskinesia. The use in Tourette’s syndrome is currently being investigated in clinical studies. Many patients achieve a modest improvement, however some show a considerable response or even complete symptom control. In some MS patients, benefits on ataxia and reduction of tremor have been observed following the administration of THC. Despite occasional positive reports, no objective success has been found in parkinsonism or Huntington disease. However, cannabis products may prove useful in levodopa-induced dyskinesia in Parkinson disease without worsening the primary symptoms.

Pain

Large clinical studies have proven analgesic properties of cannabis products. Among possible indications are neuropathic pain due to multiple sclerosis, damage of the brachial plexus and HIV infection, pain in rheumatoid arthritis, cancer pain, headache, menstrual pain, chronic bowel inflammation and neuralgias. Combination with opioids is possible.

Glaucoma

In 1971, during a systematic investigation of its effects in healthy cannabis users, it was observed that cannabis reduces intraocular pressure. In the following 12 years a number of studies in healthy individuals and glaucoma patients with cannabis and several natural and synthetic cannabinoids were conducted. cannabis decreases intraocular pressure by an average 25-30%, occasionally up to 50%. Some non-psychotropic cannabinoids, and to a lesser extent, some non-cannabinoid constituents of the hemp plant also decrease intraocular pressure.

Epilepsy

The use in epilepsy is among its historically oldest indications of cannabis. Animal experiments provide evidence of the antiepileptic effects of some cannabinoids. The anticonvulsant activity of phenytoin and diazepam have been potentiated by THC. According to a few case reports from the 20th century, some epileptic patients continue to utililize cannabis to control an otherwise unmanageable seizure disorder. Cannabis use may occasionally precipitate convulsions.

Asthma

Experiments examining the anti-asthmatic effect of THC or cannabis date mainly from the 1970s, and are all acute studies. The effects of a cannabis cigarette (2% THC) or oral THC (15 mg), respectively, approximately correspond to those obtained with therapeutic doses of common bronchodilator drugs (salbutamol, isoprenaline). Since inhalation of cannabis products may irritate the mucous membranes, oral administration or another alternative delivery system would be preferable. Very few patients developed bronchoconstriction after inhalation of THC.

Dependency and Withdrawal

According to historical and modern case reports cannabis is a good remedy to combat withdrawal in dependency on benzodiazepines, opiates and alcohol. For this reason, some have referred to it as a gateway drug back. In this context, both the reduction of physical withdrawal symptoms and stress connected with discontinuance of drug abuse may play a role in its observed benefits.

Psychiatric Symptoms

An improvement of mood in reactive depression has been observed in several clinical studies with THC. There are additional case reports claiming benefit of cannabinoids in other psychiatric symptoms and diseases, such as sleep disorders, anxiety disorders, bipolar disorders, and dysthymia. Various authors have expressed different viewpoints concerning psychiatric syndromes and cannabis. While some emphasize the problems caused by cannabis, others promote the therapeutic possibilities. Quite possibly cannabis products may be either beneficial or harmful, depending on the particular case. The attending physician and the patient should be open to a critical examination of the topic, and a frankness to both possibilities.

Autoimmune Diseases and Inflammation

In a number of painful syndromes secondary to inflammatory processes (e.g. ulcerative colitis, arthritis), cannabis products may act not only as analgesics but also demonstrate anti-inflammatory potential. For example, some patients employing cannabis report a decrease in their need for steroidal and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Moreover there are some reports of positive effects of cannabis self-medication in allergic conditions. It is as yet unclear whether cannabis products may have a relevant effects on causative processes of autoimmune diseases.

Miscellaneous, Mixed Syndromes

There are a number of positive patient reports on medical conditions that cannot be easily assigned to the above categories, such as pruritus, hiccup, ADS (attention deficit syndrome), high blood pressure, tinnitus, chronic fatigue syndrome, restless leg syndrome, and others. Several hundreds possible indications for cannabis and THC have been described by different authors. For example, 2,5 to 5 mg THC were effective in three patients with pruritus due to liver diseases. Another example is the successful treatment of a chronic hiccup that developed after a surgery. No medication was effective, but smoking of a cannabis cigarette completely abolished the symptoms.

Cannabis products often show very good effects in diseases with multiple symptoms that encompassed within the spectrum of THC effects, for example, in painful conditions that have an inflammatory origin (e.g., arthritis), or are accompanied by increased muscle tone (e.g., menstrual cramps, spinal cord injury), or in diseases with nausea and anorexia accompanied by pain, anxiety and depression, respectively (e.g. AIDS, cancer, hepatitis C).

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Weed Strains

Are you a UK retailer wanting to know which weed strains sell well in the UK? Here’s the list Weed Strains: Note that we can supply them to you at a reseller price (70% discount.) We do secure and discreet delivery. Enjoy

Acapulco Gold

Afgooey

AK 47

Alaskan Thunderfuck

Apollo 13

Banana Kush

Big Cheese

Black Cherry Soda

Black Magic Kush

Black Rhino [not allowed]

Black Widow

Blackberry

Blackberry Kush

Blue Haze

Blue Thunder

Blue Widow

Blueberry

Blueberry AK..

Blueberry Haze

Blueberry Kush

Blueberry Yum Yum

Bluecheese

Blurberry

Bubble Berry

Bubble Hash

Bubble Kush

Bubblegum

Cali Gold

Cali Hash Plant

Cali Orange Bud (C.O.B.)

California Dream

Chronic

Durban Poison

Firewalker OG

G-13 Purple Haze

Girl Scout Cookies

Grand Daddy Purple

Grape Ape

Green Poison

Jack Herer

LSD

Mango Kush

Mr. Nice Guy

Northern Lights

NYC Sour Diesel……

OG Mango

Orange Widow

Piezel

Pineapple Express

Pure Power

Pure Power Plant

Purple [not allowed]

Purple Cheese

Purple Haze

Purple Passion

Reggie

Rhino Diesel

Runuponyah

Sensi Star x AK47

Skunk #1

Sky Walker

Sleestack X Skunk

Sloppy Bowl…

Smelly Guy

Snoop’s [not allowed]

Snow Wreck

Snowcap

Sour Diesel

Sour Grape

Sour Kush

Sour OG

Sour Russian

Strawberry Cough

Strawberry Diesel

Strawberry Kush

Super Lemon Haze

Super Lemon Skunk

Super Silver Haze..

Super Skunk

Super Sour Diesel

The Magic

Triple Diesel

White Fire

White Haze

White Rhino

White Russian

White Skunk

White Widow

Weed Strains

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Smoking Weed USA

One of the only things we knew for certain about the North American weed industry prior to November last year was that regardless of the result of the vote, it was going to be big. Not just big, but spectacularly lucrative. There was no way of telling precisely how big it was likely to be, given the fact that it wasn’t entirely clear which way the nine states taking cannabis to the ballot box would vote.

Of course, we now know that the result of said vote turned out to be nothing short of outstanding for the cannabis community – all nine states having voted to legalise either recreational or medical cannabis. Which in turn meant that as far as economists and analysts were concerned, there was suddenly a lot more information to work with in terms of overall industry values.

2016 may have been an important and prosperous year for legal cannabis in the US, but experts believe we really haven’t seen the even the start of things to come. Last year, total cannabis revenues came in somewhere in the region of $5.7 billion, which in turn meant a total tax bill of approximately $1 billion. Not bad, considering how things were and are only just getting off the ground. Over the next five years however, analysts working with ArcView Research believe that we will see explosive growth across the entire cannabis industry, resulting in the total tally for 2021 coming out in excess of $21 billion.

 

And they’re not the only ones who see things accelerating wildly over the years to come. Quite to the contrary, what with a recent paper published by 10 Cowen & Co. suggesting that when the year 2026 rolls around, the legal cannabis industry in the US could be worth more than $50 billion. If so, this would make the legal cannabis industry perhaps the single fastest-growing new industry ever to have emerged in the United States, in terms of its overall value and tax contributions.

Needless to say therefore, it’s a pretty positive picture that seems to suggest wide reaching and growing benefits for an economy which, let’s face it, is always in need of a boost. Or at least, that would be the case – were it not for a rather large and tenacious onion in the proverbial ointment residing in the Oval Office right now.

Disconcertingly Vague

At the past few years, Donald Trump hasn’t given the weed community, in general, a great deal to go on, when it comes to both his personal opinions on cannabis and how he intends to tackle the issue. Every time he seems to have indicated worryingly conservative views, he has gone on to state that it’s an issue that can and should be controlled by each state individually. Which would seem to suggest that for the most part, there’s not a great deal to worry about.

Which would have been true, if it wasn’t for the fact that Jeff Sessions was recently confirmed as the new US Atty. General. Now, no doubt you’ve already come across more than a few examples of Sessions’ completely OTT and dangerous comments regarding cannabis. Whether it’s executing cannabis dealers, insisting that no “good people” in America smoke cannabis and famously stating that the KKK would be just fine if they didn’t smoke pot, he’s not exactly earned a reputation as a friend of the cannabis community. And given the fact that he has his finger on the big-red Federal law button, it’s all a little bit scary.

More recently, he was questioned directly on these exact statements and his views on cannabis legislation in general. Rather than backtracking, clarifying his stance or giving any indication whatsoever as to how he intends to proceed, he simply confirmed that he is not “ruling out” the enforcement of Federal law.  Which is, suffice to say, what the cannabis community for the most part sees as a real doomsday scenario.

The only question now being – will he actually have the audacity to go through with it?

That’s something only time will tell, but given the incredibly controversial action taken so far by the Trump Administration in various areas, it’s far from beyond the realms of possibility.

A Select Few Outcomes

The thing is though, while the cannabis community in general remains well and truly rattled, confused and unable to even guess what’s going to happen, realistically speaking there are only a few ways things could go. Or more accurately, a total of five possible outcomes in terms of how Trump, Sessions and Co. could decide to handle cannabis. Of which some are of course fundamentally more terrifying than others, but when looking at things from a logical standpoint, it also seems relatively clear which are the most probable.

That is of course, assuming that logic is something that comes into the equation!

So when the dust has settled following Trump’s turbulent arrival and the cannabis issue is brought to the table, what are the scenarios we could well be looking at?

Scenario 1 – Game Over

It goes without saying that the worst possible case scenario would be that of Sessions deciding that the time has come to declare war on cannabis and choosing to fire the first salvo. The scary thing being that as cannabis still remains entirely illegal at a Federal level – both recreational and medical cannabis alike – every single person across the US using, buying, selling or working with the stuff in any way is technically breaking the law. Which in turn means that if Federal law was to be enforced, millions could face criminal charges. To enforce Federal law would see the entire industry annihilated, leading not only to ruin for tens of thousands of currently-legitimate business owners but untold misery and agony for millions of medical cannabis users. It’s a far-fetched idea to any sane person, but it’s certainly not out of the question.

Scenario 2 – Goodbye Recreational

One considerably more plausible scenario than outright war on cannabis as a whole is that of the newly installed government instead aiming their arsenal square early and exclusively at recreational cannabis. For one thing, the recreational cannabis industry is currently in its infancy. For another, deciding to abolish recreational cannabis would mean that medical cannabis users would still be able to gain access to the essential treatment they need. This is a move the government could see as ‘nipping the problem in the bud’ and would probably gain a lot of support nationwide. After all, the overwhelming majority of US citizens may support medical marijuana – recreational cannabis continues to divide the public fairly equally down the middle.

Scenario 3 – Progress Halted

Something else the government could decide to do, albeit an incredibly complicated and difficult option, would be to ensure that the current spread of the industry is halted in its tracks. Or to put it another way, business as usual can continue in states where cannabis has been legalised, but no new states will be allowed to join the party. Of course, it would probably be impossible to bring into effect any actual law with these kinds of unbalanced stipulations. But at the same time, Sessions and Co. could make it so incredibly difficult for any new states to get involved that it would be largely impossible for them to do so.  Given the complexity of the issue, this seems like a highly improbable outcome.

Scenario 4 – Trump’s Total Support

Highly unlikely for the time being but certainly a plausible prospect for the future, it’s worth remembering that Donald Trump is a businessman. Not only this, but a spectacularly capable businessman and the president that has promised to pump billions back in the US every year, create jobs, support good causes and so on. As such, to walk away from an industry that promises more than $10 billion in tax revenues every year would seem to be a ridiculous and unthinkable move. Moreover, should Trump decide to pledge his support to the US cannabis industry, he could make history by de-scheduling pot at a Federal level. And if he does, the growth we’re likely to see over the coming years could be nothing short of mind-blowing.

Scenario 5 – The Passive Approach

Last but not least, the single most probable outcome of all is that of Trump and Co. deciding not to do anything at all. Or more specifically, leaving the cannabis community as they are right now and allowing each individual state to come up with and enforce its own cannabis policy. All of which makes sense for two very good reasons – the first of which being that the current system is both working well and has the support of the public. Secondly, there’s the way in which Trump has way bigger fish to fry than the cannabis issue and leaving things as they are would allow him to effectively escape criticism on either side of the fence. Cannabis critics would salute him for not touching Federal law, while the pro-cannabis community would breathe the biggest collective sigh of relief in its history.

Still, there are some who remain optimistic enough to actually welcome Sessions’ appointment. One of which being National Cannabis Industry Association executive director Aaron Smith, as quoted by Seed Supreme:

“We look forward to Attorney General Sessions maintaining the current federal policy of respect for legal, regulated cannabis programs in the states, and we will work with him to do that,” said Smith.

“State-legal cannabis businesses generate billions of dollars in economic activity and support tens of thousands of good-paying jobs. The projected value of the legal cannabis industry in the U.S. for 2016 is $6.7 billion, and that market value is expected to grow to $21.8 billion by 2020.”

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