Buying weed online can be safe and unsafe, depending on many different factors.

If you frequent marijuana websites, then I’m sure you have noticed a growing trend of people trying to sell marijuana over the internet. The sales pitches are bold, stating that they stock this strain and that strain, and to e-mail them for details.

These types of comments are all over not only TWB’s comments sections, but also in every large marijuana website’s comments sections. Consider this a public service announcement – beware buying marijuana on the internet.

You should really beware buying anything on the internet from a not reputable source. And realise that there is an added element when you are buying marijuana online. Not only can you get ripped off, you can get arrested when the marijuana comes in the mail. Not only are scammers posting those types of comments, I’m assuming narcs are too. Why wouldn’t they?

Does this mean that people never buy marijuana online successfully? No. I’m sure that there are many people that have bought marijuana online and do it all the time. But for every person that does it successfully, there’s an untold amount of people that get hustled or arrested.

I know that it’s tough when you can’t find marijuana. I can understand that it’s tempting to try out one of the people online to see if they are legit or not. But remember, there are bad people out there on the internet that are scamming people using all kinds of stories. Using promises to provide marijuana is just one of the latest scams. These are the same people that are pretending to be princes from Nigeria, or a long lost relative from Europe.

Don’t give these people your money. If you see their comments, flag them via Disquis. If you see them on Facebook, report them there too. I try to report as many as I can, but I am just one man working part time, and there are only so many hours during the day. Help me out by reporting these scammers on this site and any other marijuana website you see them on!

If you need marijuana so bad, go to Colorado, buy marijuana legally or illegally here https://www.hemptradecenter.com/ smoke to your hearts content.

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What is medical marijuana?

Photo of marijuana leaves.

The term medical marijuana refers to using the whole, unprocessed marijuana plant or its basic extracts to treat symptoms of illness and other conditions. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not recognized or approved the marijuana plant as medicine.

However, scientific study of the chemicals in marijuana, called cannabinoids, has led to two FDA-approved medications that contain cannabinoid chemicals in pill form. Continued research may lead to more medications.

Because the marijuana plant contains chemicals that may help treat a range of illnesses and symptoms, many people argue that it should be legal for medical purposes. In fact, a growing number of states have legalized marijuana for medical use.

General Remarks

There are marked differences in the knowledge on the medical uses of cannabis and cannabinoids in different diseases. For nausea and vomiting associated with cancer chemotherapy, anorexia and cachexia in HIV/AIDS, chronic, especially neuropathic pain, spasticity in multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury there is strong evidence for medical benefits. For many other indications, such as epilepsy, pruritus and depression there is much less available data. However, the scientific evidence for a specific indication does not necessarily reflect the actual therapeutic potential for a given disease.

Clinical studies with single cannabinoids or whole plant preparations (smoked cannabis, cannabis extract) have often been inspired by positive anecdotal experiences of patients employing crude cannabis products. The anti-emetic, the appetite enhancing, relaxing effects, analgesia, and therapeutic use in Tourette’s syndrome were all discovered in this manner.

Incidental observations have also revealed therapeutically useful effects. This occurred in a study with patients with Alzheimer’s disease wherein the primary issue was an examination of the appetite-stimulating effects of THC. Not only appetite and body weight increased, but disturbed behaviour among the patients also decreased. The discovery of decreased intraocular pressure with THC administration in the beginning of the 1970s was also serendipitous. Additional interesting indications that have not been scientifically investigated, but remain common problems in modern medicine may benefit from treatment with cannabis or cannabinoids. For this reason, surveys have been conducted questioning individuals that use cannabis therapeutically. They were conducted either as oral non-standardized interviews in the course of investigations of state or scientific institutions (House of Lords Select Committee on Science and Technology in the UK, Institute of Medicine in the USA) on the therapeutic potential of cannabis or as anonymous surveys using standardized questionnaires.

Nausea and Vomiting

Treatment of side effects associated with antineoplastic therapy is the indication for cannabinoids which has been most documented, with about 40 studies (THC, nabilone, other THC analogues, cannabis). Most trials were conducted in the 1980s. THC has to be dosed relatively highly, so that resultant side effects may occur comparatively frequently. THC was inferior to high-dose metoclopramide in one study. There are no comparisons of THC to the modern serotonin antagonists. Some recent investigations have shown that THC in low doses improves the efficacy of other antiemetic drugs if given together. In folk medicine cannabinoids are popular and are often used in other causes of nausea including AIDS and hepatitis.

Anorexia and Cachexia

An appetite enhancing effect of THC is observed with daily divided doses totalling 5 mg. When required, the daily dose may be increased to 20 mg. In a long-term study of 94 AIDS patients, the appetite-stimulating effect of THC continued for months, confirming the appetite enhancement noted in a shorter 6 week study. THC doubled appetite on a visual analogue scale in comparison to placebo. Patients tended to retain a stable body weight over the course of seven months. A positive influence on body weight was also reported in 15 patients with Alzheimer’s disease who were previously refusing food.

Spasticity

In many clinical trials of THC, nabilone and cannabis, a beneficial effect on spasticity caused by multiple sclerosis or spinal cord injury has been observed. Among other positively influenced symptoms were pain, paraesthesia, tremor and ataxia. In some studies improved bladder control was observed. There is also some anecdotal evidence of a benefit of cannabis in spasticity due to lesions of the brain.

Movement Disorders

There are some positive anecdotal reports of therapeutic response to cannabis in Tourette’s syndrome, dystonia and tardive dyskinesia. The use in Tourette’s syndrome is currently being investigated in clinical studies. Many patients achieve a modest improvement, however some show a considerable response or even complete symptom control. In some MS patients, benefits on ataxia and reduction of tremor have been observed following the administration of THC. Despite occasional positive reports, no objective success has been found in parkinsonism or Huntington disease. However, cannabis products may prove useful in levodopa-induced dyskinesia in Parkinson disease without worsening the primary symptoms.

Pain

Large clinical studies have proven analgesic properties of cannabis products. Among possible indications are neuropathic pain due to multiple sclerosis, damage of the brachial plexus and HIV infection, pain in rheumatoid arthritis, cancer pain, headache, menstrual pain, chronic bowel inflammation and neuralgias. Combination with opioids is possible.

Glaucoma

In 1971, during a systematic investigation of its effects in healthy cannabis users, it was observed that cannabis reduces intraocular pressure. In the following 12 years a number of studies in healthy individuals and glaucoma patients with cannabis and several natural and synthetic cannabinoids were conducted. cannabis decreases intraocular pressure by an average 25-30%, occasionally up to 50%. Some non-psychotropic cannabinoids, and to a lesser extent, some non-cannabinoid constituents of the hemp plant also decrease intraocular pressure.

Epilepsy

The use in epilepsy is among its historically oldest indications of cannabis. Animal experiments provide evidence of the antiepileptic effects of some cannabinoids. The anticonvulsant activity of phenytoin and diazepam have been potentiated by THC. According to a few case reports from the 20th century, some epileptic patients continue to utililize cannabis to control an otherwise unmanageable seizure disorder. Cannabis use may occasionally precipitate convulsions.

Asthma

Experiments examining the anti-asthmatic effect of THC or cannabis date mainly from the 1970s, and are all acute studies. The effects of a cannabis cigarette (2% THC) or oral THC (15 mg), respectively, approximately correspond to those obtained with therapeutic doses of common bronchodilator drugs (salbutamol, isoprenaline). Since inhalation of cannabis products may irritate the mucous membranes, oral administration or another alternative delivery system would be preferable. Very few patients developed bronchoconstriction after inhalation of THC.

Dependency and Withdrawal

According to historical and modern case reports cannabis is a good remedy to combat withdrawal in dependency on benzodiazepines, opiates and alcohol. For this reason, some have referred to it as a gateway drug back. In this context, both the reduction of physical withdrawal symptoms and stress connected with discontinuance of drug abuse may play a role in its observed benefits.

Psychiatric Symptoms

An improvement of mood in reactive depression has been observed in several clinical studies with THC. There are additional case reports claiming benefit of cannabinoids in other psychiatric symptoms and diseases, such as sleep disorders, anxiety disorders, bipolar disorders, and dysthymia. Various authors have expressed different viewpoints concerning psychiatric syndromes and cannabis. While some emphasize the problems caused by cannabis, others promote the therapeutic possibilities. Quite possibly cannabis products may be either beneficial or harmful, depending on the particular case. The attending physician and the patient should be open to a critical examination of the topic, and a frankness to both possibilities.

Autoimmune Diseases and Inflammation

In a number of painful syndromes secondary to inflammatory processes (e.g. ulcerative colitis, arthritis), cannabis products may act not only as analgesics but also demonstrate anti-inflammatory potential. For example, some patients employing cannabis report a decrease in their need for steroidal and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Moreover there are some reports of positive effects of cannabis self-medication in allergic conditions. It is as yet unclear whether cannabis products may have a relevant effects on causative processes of autoimmune diseases.

Miscellaneous, Mixed Syndromes

There are a number of positive patient reports on medical conditions that cannot be easily assigned to the above categories, such as pruritus, hiccup, ADS (attention deficit syndrome), high blood pressure, tinnitus, chronic fatigue syndrome, restless leg syndrome, and others. Several hundreds possible indications for cannabis and THC have been described by different authors. For example, 2,5 to 5 mg THC were effective in three patients with pruritus due to liver diseases. Another example is the successful treatment of a chronic hiccup that developed after a surgery. No medication was effective, but smoking of a cannabis cigarette completely abolished the symptoms.

Cannabis products often show very good effects in diseases with multiple symptoms that encompassed within the spectrum of THC effects, for example, in painful conditions that have an inflammatory origin (e.g., arthritis), or are accompanied by increased muscle tone (e.g., menstrual cramps, spinal cord injury), or in diseases with nausea and anorexia accompanied by pain, anxiety and depression, respectively (e.g. AIDS, cancer, hepatitis C).

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Marijuana’s expansion is incredible. Still, it may not be as jaw-dropping and surprising as the study released by the Pew Research CenterOpens a New Window. last month that showed a surprising group of individuals who want to see marijuana legalized on a national scale.

Between May and August of 2016, Pew interviewed a national sample of more than 7,900 police officers in local police and sheriff departments with at least 100 sworn officers to get their opinion on whether or not marijuana should be legalized nationally. Pew’s findings showed that:

  • 32% of the police officers believe cannabis should be legal for recreational and medical purposes nationally.
  • 37% of police officers want to see marijuana legalized nationally for medical use only.
  • 30% of police officers believe pot should remain illegal nationally.

You’ll note that rounding keeps the figures from adding perfectly to 100%, but that by more than a two-to-one margin police officers around the country would prefer to see marijuana at least legalized for medical use. Though within the margin of error of two to three percentage points, fully legalizing the drug is also slightly more popular than keeping it entirely illegal. Consistent with other previous studies, younger police officers are considerably more likely to favor some form of legalization than older police officers (ages 50 and up).

It’s worth pointing out that police officers were still notably more conservative in their views than the general public. Pew questioned more than 4,500 adults between August and September 2016 and found that 49% wanted to see cannabis legalized for a recreational and medical purpose; 35% wanted to see it legalized for medical use only, and just 15% opposed its national legalization. Once again, rounding keeps these figures from adding to 100%.

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With 28 states legalizing medical marijuana and eight going one step further with legal recreational use, the cannabis business is booming. But since the drug isn’t yet federally legal, there are still bureaucratic roadblocks for investors looking to go legit on the weed-equivalent of Wall Street.

One barrier weed advocates and entrepreneurs encounter is the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration’s (DEA) classification of the drug. Marijuana is classified as a Schedule I drug, or “substances, or chemicals defined as drugs with no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse,” according to the federal government. This groups weed with more serious and dangerous drugs like LSD, ecstasy, and heroin. However, the National Commission on Marijuana and Drug Abuse issued a series of reports concluding that marijuana was “less a serious threat to public health than a sensitive social issue and recommended changes to federal law that would permit citizens to possess a small amount of it at a time, while still maintaining that the drug should not be legalized.” Weed’s mis-classification poses restrictions for patients in non-weed-friendly states who are seeking marijuana to treat serious illnesses. Its Schedule-I title also puts a damper on investors’ plans: The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA)—the chief regulator of Wall Street—blocked a S-1 filing from weed companies attempting to go public and trade stock until the drug is re-scheduled.

Despite these challenges, the economic potential of the blossoming cannabis industry may be worthwhile. If you’re willing to risk it all for a career in weed, check out this advice from Khadijah Adams, the founder and CEO of Cannabis consulting company MIPR Holdings. Complex talked to the entrepreneur about how to invest in the weed industry:

Can you explain what “the green rush” is?
The green rush is referred to as the beginning of recreational cannabis. Kind of like the Gold Rush where people discovered gold, where they came searching and seeking, rushing to find it. Colorado legalized recreational cannabis on January 1st 2014, and that was the beginning of the green rush. I actually sold everything in my house, had a garage sale, kept my clothes and cell phone, my computer, loaded up Mercedes and hit the road.

Tell us about the birth of your marijuana consulting company, MIPR holdings.
I met a couple young ladies in the industry and I reached out prior to coming to Colorado by phone and made some calls. They really encouraged me to just get involved in the community and just get to know the people, and get to know the foundation, and how it all started. And that’s what I began to do because I didn’t know how I would fit in.

What are some of the risks of investing in marijuana stock? 
One of the major big risks that most experts would point to is the fact that is cannabis is still illegal and the Feds can come in at any time and shut the whole program down at anytime. So you’re taking a risk there—whether you’re touching the plant or not. That’s why we have classes and education teaching the basics. And we invite people to come in and get the information they need before jumping into cannabis stocks or any investments. We’re not financial advisers or brokers or anything like that—I’m an investor just like they are—but it’s always good to have someone you can speak to and say hey, is this a good move or not?

What’s a common misconception about the marijuana business?
I share with people that I’m in the cannabis industry, they automatically assume that I’m touching the plant—but the only time I’m touching the plant is when I consume it. When you start investing in the cannabis industry or stock, they assume that you’re actually investing in the plant. They don’t realize that this is an entire industry that has an advertising company, a marketing company, a PR company within the industry.

The common misconception is that everyone is a pothead and smoking weed and the world’s going to end. How I debunk that is through character and presentation. You lead by example. When you show people that you are not the “typical pothead” that they’ve pictured through propaganda and the media, they get a different perspective, and they are really shocked. They say, “Oh my god, really? You smoke cannabis, but you’re so professional!”

There’s a lot of professionals in the closet. And I was in the closet for a long time, but times have changed. In the next two to ten years, we’re going to see a lot more changes.

What kind of changes?
Federal Legalization: I believe the cannabis industry will be legalized on the federal level. There will be families that will stand out, just like the Kennedys stood out when alcohol prohibition ended. Joseph Kennedy became the fifteenth wealthiest man in America and 85 percent of his wealth came from alcohol, according to the New York Times and what other experts believe, and this is why we know the Kennedys. People that will create generational wealth when federal legalization happens, it’s going to be the people that take advantage of their time and positioning. That’s where we are right now.

What advice would you give to someone looking to invest in the cannabis industry?
I would tell them to buckle up, because they are in for a ride and the surprise of a lifetime. It is a brand new legalized industry. You’re going to see a little bit of this and a little bit of that. I can tell you that you better have a big pair of pants and a pair of high boots on. But it is exciting. Get with like-minded individuals that are doing things and going places and making things happen and align yourself with these people, and stay focused. The money will come, but being able to be of service to people in the industry and working to perfect that is key to success. [Be] committed, because this industry is changing every single day.

You have companies that are start-up companies and the OTC Market (over the counter market), [where] you’re dealing with a lot of penny stocks … They are very volatile—there’s no liquidity, which means they have no money. They are actually going to the OTC to raise money to pay off early investors; some of them are raising money to avoid bankruptcy. Some of them are raising money to fund their project or products or services or whatever they’re offering. And so they don’t have a lot of information, they don’t have any past history that an investor can look at and say, “Okay, let me see what they did a few years ago and compare it to what they want to do now.” So you’re taking a big risk on some fairly new companies and some of them are penny stocks—not all of them—but the ones that are, they’re big risks.

Before you invest in any company, get as much information about that company as you possibly can … Find out if they are even a legitimate company … Who’s the management team, who’s running the company? Look at the company’s finances, the balance sheet, the cash flow, the income statement, the shareholder’s equity. Look at all of that before making a decision. Call the nearby Chambers of Commerce, find out if they’re even a legitimate company, if they even know the people. Get some background on the management as well. That’s the advice that I give and to really speak to a financial adviser before getting started because most people really don’t know their financial investment needs. Many of us are new to this, and it’s because of cannabis that a lot of us are new to the investment side.

Coming into this industry, networking is key. Mix and mingle with people, get to know them and establish relationships because you never know who they may know. But once you find out what it is you want to do, have a crystal clear vision of what that looks like. Align with the right people—positive people. And people who can actually encourage you and help take you to the next level. That’s with any industry, but especially with the cannabis industry because you’re dealing with a new industry where many people are coming from underground and really don’t have the business 101 yet. That’s why so many educational platforms are popping up here and there. As a newcomer, as an entrepreneur, be mindful of your time. It’s valuable and you can never get it back. Make key contacts.

It wasn’t until one evening when I had come home and my spouse at the time shared with me that he began adding cannabis stocks to our portfolio. When he shared that with me, a lightbulb went off and I was like, “Marijuana stock, what? Are you kidding me, we have marijuana stocks, there’s marijuana stocks?”

I began to do my research and began to be a student of people who had earned money in the industry. I began to give him different companies to invest in and then I opened my own account and began to invest myself. And my story got out there and people began to call me and say, “Can you teach me how to do this? Can you show me the basics?” … I began to help people, next thing you know, I started MIPR Holdings, Marijuana Investment and Private Retreat. We are a professional consulting service with a focus on investor relations. We help accredited investors and connect them to investment opportunities in the industry. We work with the investors and connect investors to small to mid-sized companies looking for funding and also to investment firms in the cannabis industry. [People who called me] wanted to learn how to invest online from the comfort of their own home. So, that’s how I got started. But I also wanted to educate people and warn them about the risks of investing in this industry as well.

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Saint John police have sparked a debate over what seems to be a growing industry in the Maritimes. This week, police raided and shut down several marijuana dispensaries that they say were operating illegally, but some argue it’s a necessary service.

Brock Merchant is the son of the owner of HBB Medical Inc, one of six marijuana dispensaries raided. Merchant says they had hundreds of regular customers, who have now lost a fast and reliable source of marijuana products.

“Right now unfortunately, even if they want to go through licensed producers, you’re three to five days away. So that being said, you turn to the black market, you’re back down with buddy down the street, and God knows what you’re buying,” says Merchant.

– Read the entire article at CTV News.

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‘I didn’t know what to look for’ says Judith Brooke of her attempts to procure cannabis.

Medicine Hat senior Judith Brooke had never touched marijuana in her entire life – before last month.

The 75-year-old suffers from a severe case of sciatica. The pain in her lower back was so bad, it made her immobile for months.

Brooke says she tried pharmaceutical drugs Oxycontin and Percocet first, but had allergic reactions to both.

Then, in December, her family doctor authorized marijuana for medical use.

– Read the entire article at CBC News.

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